Poetry

Heads in the Radio

by Tom Saer The doyen of the television cables crouches, one knee resting on the dashboard:  He exclaims this is  The first and last attempt to dull the children’s mouths! They’ve taught themselves diplomacy with brightly coloured picture-books.

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Poetry

A Thinker’s Rage

by David Asamoah   Please pity me, I bear a thinker’s rage  For Sleep and all her sweet unconscious charms  How I have dreamt to be held in her arms  To end Day’s chapter on Night’s unmarked page  Please comfort me, for waking worries wage  Chaos upon my mind no comfort calms  Though thoughts of […]

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Comment, Prose

A Word from the Editors: Revolution

by Michael Angerer It is somewhat surprising – and then, perhaps not – that the word ‘revolution’ is in itself quite unconventional: it was adopted partly from French and partly from Latin (as the Oxford English Dictionary reliably informs us) and can ultimately be traced back to the Latin revolvere, meaning ‘to revolve’; and, indeed, […]

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Comment, Prose

To Those Who Are Not Revolutionaries

by Monim Wains To the ones who lead good lives that are completely unremarkable. Those who live happy and fulfilled without doing anything that seems significant. To the vast majority of you. Have we all failed? No. Of course not. But what does that mean? Why is it that when history is taught, and the […]

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Interview, Prose

Oriel Interviews: Nick

‘Everyone at Oriel is friendly and willing to help’ Interview conducted by Chloe Whitehead Nick, one of Oriel’s dedicated food preparation assistants, started working in College as a kitchen porter in early July this year. Born in Oxford when the Westgate shopping centre was still terraced housing, he enjoys walking along the beautiful canals and […]

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Humour, Prose

Misfortune and Monopoly

by Peter Hammerton Any self-proclaimed board games aficionado, sitting in a café playing The Settlers of Catan with a tattoo of an icosahedral die on his forearm, will tell you that Monopoly is terrible. It lasts forever; it’s obvious who’s going to win long before it ends; it’s a glorification of capitalism, rugged individualism and […]

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Creative Writing, Prose

The True Fortune

by Monim Wains Behemoth blocks of glass and concrete rolled by the window of the bus, wobbling in the streaks of London’s rain. Alex gave no notice to the wet-smelling air from the window, too busy tapping his foot on the floor. He kept biting on his lip, his head stiff and restless. Butterflies flitted […]

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