Interview, Prose

JCR Peer Supporters: George Mundy

Interview by Michael Angerer George Mundy, our first peer supporter to be interviewed for The Poor Print, is from the ‘lovely little pseudo-village’ of Hampton Hill. He is in his second year of studying Biochemistry, and he plays lacrosse, basketball, and Nintendo. George lives in the Dolls House in Third Quad, in 12.5, and is […]

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Prose, Reviews

You Are Frogs: A Review

by Michael Angerer The self-described dark comedy You Are Frogs, put on by Practically Peter Productions, is above all a baffling play: perhaps the most baffling theatrical experience to come out of this term. Having ascended the steps up to the Burton Taylor studio, the unsuspecting playgoer intrudes into the depressingly bright-coloured kitchen of two frogs, […]

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Creative Writing, Prose

The Tears of an African Run Inside

by Atinuke Olu-Lutherking The silver streaks in her hair glistened in the white light. I stared into her kola-nut coloured eyes. Her delicate wrinkles softened as she smiled. I couldn’t help but grin at her. She couldn’t help but smile at me. Life was sweet. The door creaked open. A woman strolled in. Suddenly, the […]

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Comment, Prose

Mirror

by Monim Wains I am a ghost in the machine. I am not you, and you are not me. Each of us is unique, different, maybe even special, in our own special way. We are all the results of our actions and thoughts, dreams and regrets, and every single one of us is a sole […]

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Comment, Prose

Dwellings of Immortal Souls

by Harriet Strahl While walking in the park and reading the names engraved on the wooden benches along the path, I realized that there are not many things that Plato, Descartes and most religions agree upon. One of these rare beliefs is the immortality of the soul. Science has not yet even proven the existence […]

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Poetry

Glowing on the Fifth February

by Tom Saer My back in plasters, heading back. I find some swans three years ago, they start to turn around my ears. I saw the other world in water trees, the ripple spreads, its secondary eyes are open. Close and open irises to me, reflection past the open tree. Someone must have taken out […]

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Comment, Prose

Indices of the Soul

by Zixin Jiang Why is it said that the eyes are windows to the soul? One common interpretation is that our eyes reveal our innermost thoughts and emotions. There’s probably some truth to that; a person’s eyes can sometimes reveal whether they are lying, or faking a smile. However, a seasoned orator may be able […]

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Comment, Prose

A Word from the Editors: Soul

by Michael Angerer The need to identify the essential being of all things, the underlying truth hidden behind superficial appearances, seems to be an irresistible impulse; it is in any case certain that the concept of a soul, or a psyche, is among the oldest known to humanity, and among the most widespread. And yet, […]

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Humour, Prose

‘Dear Beary…’ [4]

by Beary McBearface Beary McBearface, treasured Oriel mascot and JCR staple, is here to help you with your troubles. In this column,  Beary will attempt to find solutions to your little college worries; trust him, he’s seen it all. All you need to do is email thepoorprint@oriel.ox.ac.uk with the subject line ‘Dear Beary’, and if you’re lucky your […]

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Prose, Reviews

Bandages: A Review

by Monim Wains Bandages is not a play that covers up or protects. It is designed to rip off the mask and question you directly. With an intense and emotional exploration of control, image, abuse and violence, Bandages will leave you genuinely disturbed and uncomfortable, which is exactly what it wants to do. The clearly heartfelt issues […]

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Poetry

The Rollercoaster

by Monim Wains A highlight of life for all that tried Everyone older remembered their ride ‘The best time of your life’, they sighed It looked so good every time I walked by Everyone getting off with a glint in their eye A hundred crazy stories that I wanted to try If only I could, […]

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Poetry

Dido, Queen of Carthage

by Juliet Butcher varium et mutabile semper femina (Aeneid IV.569-70) Whistle-wet and wind-whipped and smarting with salt, the air bursts lungs – clean lungs, lungs clear and full – and cuts, slicing quick across face, stinging stiff and garrotte-sharp like the cords of a ship, as she stands on the citadel and watches. Gleaming sky […]

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Interview, Prose

Oriel Interviews: Ellie

‘It’s nice to chat with students, and we all like them’ Interview conducted by Michael Angerer Ellie, from Rome, is known to most students as one of the friendliest faces in hall, which also happens to be one of her favourite places in College. She enjoys reading, going to the cinema, eating out, and drawing; […]

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Poetry

Affirmation

by Tom Saer You, kissing in the daylight Toothless puzzle pieces Telling every dog of the world to heal Come and see, songs and voices in the bowl which I found once my eyes were closed, come and see the rest of everything along with me. Hand me over to the times when you smile, […]

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Creative Writing, Prose

Desire

by Leo Gillard He’d always been the object of desire. Not… not always in the way he was now, of course, but people had always wanted something. And they felt like they could get it from him, or because of him. When he’d been young, it had been about power. Then again, maybe it was […]

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Poetry

On Love

by David Asamoah Potent’s the fruit of poisonous affection Yet so fragrant a scent it does possess Love’s filter warps old flaws to new perfection Augments mere brushes to a soft caress Such passion feeds upon the human mind As hearth embers devoùr firewood And of the ripened dreams Eros does find He then extorts […]

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Comment, Prose

Realising Desires

by Martin Yip In Hong Kong there is a saying that there are five things every university student should do: that is, study, date, live in halls, join committees of clubs and societies, and work part-time. Some might conform to this apparent social norm and desire to do all five, as if that would affirm […]

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Humour, Prose

‘Dear Beary…’ [3]

by Beary McBearface Beary McBearface, treasured Oriel mascot and JCR staple, is here to help you with your troubles. In this column,  Beary will attempt to find solutions to your little college worries; trust him, he’s seen it all. All you need to do is email thepoorprint@oriel.ox.ac.uk with the subject line ‘Dear Beary’, and if […]

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Comment, Prose

Like as the Hart

by Zixin Jiang Of all the songs we sing at Oriel Chapel, nothing makes me feel like a hypocrite quite like this line does: ‘Like as the hart desireth the waterbrooks, so longeth my soul after thee, O God.’ ‘Lord, have mercy’? I can sing that. ‘It is right to give Him thanks and praise’? […]

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Creative Writing, Prose

When the Green Meets the Red, White and Blue

by Monim Wains I was born green, but thrown into red, white and blue. Two tsunami waves crashing into a grey ten-tonne wall. Tall and loud, rushing and gushing with full force right at me. Two oceans, continent-sized, pushing into each other. A ridge of mountains right between my lungs.  You must stay home, says […]

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Comment, Prose

Old Habits Die Hard

by Monim Wains Perhaps the most comprehensive definition of tradition is the idiom in the title of this article; tradition is nothing but old habits that refuse to stay in the past where they first began. Of course, this sounds quite critical. With the constant need for change and improvement in the world, old habits […]

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Comment, Prose

The Paradox of Tradition

by Zixin Jiang At Oriel Choir this term, we are trying to revive (or rather, revive the enforcement of) the tradition of wearing cassocks (those red things we wear) during rehearsals before a service. I knew this was something we were supposed to do, but I never really knew why. Apparently, the point is to […]

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Comment, Prose

A Word from the Editors: Tradition

by Michael Angerer Modernity is the central tenet of our age, which likes to classify itself as ‘post-modern’, ‘post-colonial’, and ‘post-truth’; we tend to look upon tradition as stuffy, out-dated, and generally irrelevant to what our everyday lives should be. As you might have guessed from the presence of this column, however, there is far […]

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Humour, Prose

‘Dear Beary…’ [2]

by Beary McBearface Beary McBearface, treasured Oriel mascot and JCR staple, is here to help you with your troubles. In this column,  Beary will attempt to find solutions to your little college worries; trust him, he’s seen it all. All you need to do is email thepoorprint@oriel.ox.ac.uk with the subject line ‘Dear Beary’, and if […]

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Poetry

Two Hours and One Minute in the Bottom of the Sky

by Tom Saer I found some orange peel, carrot peel, on the pavement, left for Chester Burnett… Peeling off the snow from a branch I leave it to fall over me. My hands, a change, a pretty Sun in them, press on the snowman’s belly, he collapsed before I got there; he was rigid, the […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone: A Review

by Michael Angerer As you step into the small dark space of the Burton Taylor Studio to watch Selma Dimitrijevic’s Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone, you enter a strangely surreal place: a place in which all eyes rest on two similar figures who sit facing each other, silently staring each other down. The […]

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Humour, Prose

‘Dear Beary…’ [1]

by Beary McBearface Beary McBearface, treasured Oriel mascot and JCR staple, is here to help you with your troubles. In this column,  Beary will attempt to find solutions to your little college worries; trust him, he’s seen it all. All you need to do is email thepoorprint@oriel.ox.ac.uk with the subject line ‘Dear Beary’, and if […]

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Poetry

1/1440 rpm

by Ruida Ding   Lay me down Sumptuous covers, queen size bed Scrumptious lover, cheeks brick-red Pull me closer You’ve won it   Online blog Epistemology Cocktail bar Ethnography Received your Master of Art and Science in Anthropology A thousand names in your biography Overqualified to explore my Biology   Desires orchestrated Intimacy engineered Don […]

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Comment, Prose

How Revolutions Matter

by Martin Yip I was first introduced to Les Misérables in seventh-grade music class: whenever our music teacher had time to spare at the end of class, he would go on YouTube and play us clips of its musical adaptations. I was captivated, and when a few years later the film adaptation was released, I […]

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News, Prose

Gilets Jaunes: Thoughts

by Louise Edge Along with the huge quantities of cheese and wine that are practically mandatory here, popular protest is amongst the many cliches I’ve experienced over four months of living here in France. In spite of this, I could never have anticipated the scale of unrest that has taken place during my time so […]

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Poetry

Heads in the Radio

by Tom Saer The doyen of the television cables crouches, one knee resting on the dashboard:  He exclaims this is  The first and last attempt to dull the children’s mouths! They’ve taught themselves diplomacy with brightly coloured picture-books.

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Poetry

A Thinker’s Rage

by David Asamoah   Please pity me, I bear a thinker’s rage  For Sleep and all her sweet unconscious charms  How I have dreamt to be held in her arms  To end Day’s chapter on Night’s unmarked page  Please comfort me, for waking worries wage  Chaos upon my mind no comfort calms  Though thoughts of […]

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Comment, Prose

A Word from the Editors: Revolution

by Michael Angerer It is somewhat surprising – and then, perhaps not – that the word ‘revolution’ is in itself quite unconventional: it was adopted partly from French and partly from Latin (as the Oxford English Dictionary reliably informs us) and can ultimately be traced back to the Latin revolvere, meaning ‘to revolve’; and, indeed, […]

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Comment, Prose

To Those Who Are Not Revolutionaries

by Monim Wains To the ones who lead good lives that are completely unremarkable. Those who live happy and fulfilled without doing anything that seems significant. To the vast majority of you. Have we all failed? No. Of course not. But what does that mean? Why is it that when history is taught, and the […]

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