Culture, Prose, Reviews

Spring Awakening: A Review

by Raghav Arora and Samanwita Sen Spring Awakening is a bold take on teenage sexuality. It follows the experiences of various adolescents,’ sexuality coming to full bloom, with a major focus on Wendla Bergmann as she forays into the unfamiliar territory of lustful passion in her relationship with Melchior Gabor. The play strikes a fine […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

My Mother Runs in Zig-Zags: A Review

by Samanwita Sen When walking away after watching a performance of My Mother Runs in Zig-Zags, perhaps the most lasting impression one is left with is how seamlessly and intricately the play has been put together. It’s no secret that, when watching the play, every note that is struck, every movement that is executed, and every […]

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Culture, Prose

Heartless Love

by Martin Yip The Chinese writing system is one of the most beautiful currently in use. Compared to alphabets, whose characters are phonographic (meaning they represent sounds), Chinese characters are logographic: each character represents a word or phrase. The result is a system that elegantly condenses information, and rich in aesthetic value. Around two millennia […]

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Prose, Reviews

You Are Frogs: A Review

by Michael Angerer The self-described dark comedy You Are Frogs, put on by Practically Peter Productions, is above all a baffling play: perhaps the most baffling theatrical experience to come out of this term. Having ascended the steps up to the Burton Taylor studio, the unsuspecting playgoer intrudes into the depressingly bright-coloured kitchen of two frogs, […]

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Prose, Reviews

Bandages: A Review

by Monim Wains Bandages is not a play that covers up or protects. It is designed to rip off the mask and question you directly. With an intense and emotional exploration of control, image, abuse and violence, Bandages will leave you genuinely disturbed and uncomfortable, which is exactly what it wants to do. The clearly heartfelt issues […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone: A Review

by Michael Angerer As you step into the small dark space of the Burton Taylor Studio to watch Selma Dimitrijevic’s Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone, you enter a strangely surreal place: a place in which all eyes rest on two similar figures who sit facing each other, silently staring each other down. The […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Talaash: A Preview

by Zad El Bacha I was cold and tired, searching for Saint Antony’s music room, when a vibrant singing called to me from across the quad. I stepped into the room, and the energy of the cast and the rich, vivid music overwhelmed me. This is how I was introduced to a preview of Talaash, […]

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Culture, Prose

Saving Imagination: Myth and Legend in World War I Poetry

by Grace Khuri This year marks the centenary of the Armistice that ended World War I on 11 November, 1918. Throughout the nation, memorial events—both intellectual and artistic—have been and still are taking place. During this commemorative season, I would like to draw attention to a perhaps underappreciated aspect of World War I poets, namely […]

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Music

Idyll

by Lauren Hill; original composition for piano, flute, clarinet, violin and cello. Performed by players from the CHROMA ensemble. Score to be found here.

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Comment, Culture, News, Prose

The Art of the Teal

by Amanda Higgin Xanda and I are on the bus heading from my home town into Oxford. The skies outside are grey, a welcome cool after months of heat. I’m wearing jeans for the first time since June! A few seats in front of us, I spot Boris Johnson’s scruffy form on the front page […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The White Devil: A Preview

by Christopher Hill As I walk into the Jesus College lodge to ask where to go for the play, I notice the porter flag down a student who I would later find out to be part of the backstage crew. I didn’t catch the whole conversation but it went something along the lines of: ‘I’m […]

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Comment, Culture, Prose

Fragm[entary t]houghts

by Caroline Ball Imagine yourself years from now, when by a freak coincidence all recordings of the Star Wars films have been lost. All that survives are brief extracts…from the prequels. Sounds horrifying? I’m only just getting started. Not only have you lost 90% of the original material, but no single surviving clip is longer […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The Lonesome West: A Review

by Michael Angerer A kitchen in the west of Ireland, home to two ill-compatible brothers, haunted by the alcoholic parish priest and supplied with booze by an enterprising schoolgirl: such is the scene that unfolds to the audience in the current production of The Lonesome West at the Burton Taylor Studio. The atmosphere of this […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Travesties: A Review

Review by Amanda Higgin Photos by Luke Wintour A Romanian, an Irishman, a Russian and an Englishman walk into a public library in 1917 Zurich. What ensues is a beautifully crafted work, skilfully derived from complex and challenging source material. The design is fascinating, the performances are superb, but most of all my respect must […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Ishtar: A Review

Poignant, dark, and fun – Ishtar is proof that age does not matter, and that some stories are timeless. Bringing to life of one of the oldest poems in the world from Ancient Mesopotamia, Ishtar tells the story of the eponymous Goddess of Love and War (Leela Jadhav) as she ventures into the underworld to […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Blood Wedding: A Review

by Chloe Whitehead ‘Let the Bride awake!’ Intrigue and betrayal reigns in this adaptation of Federico García Lorca’s 1930s classic, Blood Wedding. The Burton Taylor Studio provides an intimate and compelling venue for the drama, with only two rows of seats before the scandal-riven world of rural Spain encroaches upon the audience. Despite only watching […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Hedda: A Review

Review by Amanda Higgin Photos by Georgia Crowther Oriel’s College’s own Poor Print had the first set of eyes on this much-anticipated Playhouse production in dress rehearsal. Even without making allowances for the adjustments and polishing that will take place before opening night, Hedda was excellent. A carefully curated, visually stunning, compelling masterwork – it […]

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Comment, Culture, Prose

Slow Travel: Colonised by Capitalism

by Tobias Thornes It was with some regret that I set out again to sea, and left the magical island and its comforting solidarity in exchange for days and nights sliding across the empty waves. This time, though, my journey was to be much shorter than before, and it wasn’t long I had to wait […]

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Comment, Culture, Prose

Meme Analysis: Expectation vs. Reality

by Emma Gilpin “Expectation vs. Reality” is a classic meme, one that has achieved its success through the relatability of its wry analysis of the sometimes seemingly unrelenting disappointments of modern life. The internet is a strange, ethereal space where we are able to connect with people who have similar, or wildly different, interests and […]

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Comment, Music, Prose

The Sound of Instability

by Lauren Hill Dissonance pervades our world. Tensions and conflict can tear apart the perceived stability of our lives, shifting harmony and order into a harsh cacophony of sound.  In relation to psychology, cognitive dissonance can be explained as the inner mental conflict which results from simultaneously holding contradictory and incongruous beliefs; in order to […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

A Tale of Two Halves: A Review of Twelfth Night

by Chloe Whitehead Five English students, a medic and some wholesome Shakespeare – a day out made in heaven? We thought so. On a rainy Thursday in January we went to see Twelfth Night at the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon, and on the whole witnessed a brilliant performance. Despite being an English student, I’d […]

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Music

Wave

An original composition for piano, by Chris Hill. Download the score here

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Beautiful Thing: A Review

by Amanda Higgin It is often said that simple things are beautiful, and this show was certainly a Beautiful Thing. This straightforward but delicately told story brings its audience to three neighbouring flats in a London council estate. Jamie lives with his mother, Sandra, and her boyfriend, Tony. On one side lives Leah, who has […]

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Comment, Culture, Prose

Becoming Vulnerable

by Michael Leong It is 3am now. A couple of us had been playing ice hockey; afterwards, JJ and I retired to my room and decided to plan next term’s Oxford Mental Health Support Network launch over a couple of beers. Our conversation returned, as it tends to do, to the people we’re hoping to […]

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Music

Memory

An original composition for piano, by Chris Hill. Download the score here  

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Comment, Culture, Prose

Gaps

by Amanda Higgin On the last day of Summer Eights, Oriel’s first crew walks away from the river exhausted and a little disappointed. A couple of promising bumps in the first races were followed by a few uneventful row-overs, leaving them the fourth boat on the river. Close enough to take the headship next year, […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The Lieutenant of Inishmore: A Preview

by Teofil Camarasu Upon arriving to watch a dress rehearsal of the The Lieutenant of Inishmore, I was told that I would be watching the first run of the show with genuine fake blood (until then they had used water instead). The first row of seats had provisionally been designated a splash-zone, and was covered in […]

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Culture, Food & Drink, Prose

Cut-Price Cuisine: Guacamole

by Alice Correia Morton Avocados are the hipster ingredient du jour, present at every brunch and scattered over every instagrammed salad. But even if you’d usually steer clear of such fads, avocados still hold their own: they are highly nutritious, with over 20 vitamins and minerals, and a filling centrepiece for vegetarians and vegans. Unfortunately, […]

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Culture, Food & Drink, Prose

Cut-Price Cuisine: Double Courgette Omelette

by Alice Correia Morton This isn’t strictly from the reduced section of the supermarket, but this week courgettes are bizarrely cheap in Tesco (4 medium for 79p or 60p). After the recent shortage and hike in price, this might come as a pleasant surprise. Although simple, omelettes are both filling and, since this one includes […]

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Culture, Food & Drink, Prose

Cut-Price Cuisine: Cheat’s Penne Primavera

by Alice Correia Morton Although I didn’t give myself enough time to make this recipe vegan, it is completely vegetarian. The key ingredient of the dish is one of Tesco’s pre-prepared medleys of ‘vegetables with herbed butter’, particularly the one comprised of asparagus, edamame beans and tender stem broccoli etc.. It tends to be in the […]

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Culture, Playlist, Prose

Fracture: a Playlist

by Georgia Robson. Listen to the playlist on Spotify here. Often, we would think of ‘fracture’ in music to be negative. Smooth, slick and overproduced pop has been the order of the charts for quite some time now.  Yet there are many great artists who challenge this. To me, fracture has three possible meanings in […]

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Culture, Prose

Arts Week Daily Music: High Life

by Alex Waygood For a man who has a lot to say, Brian Eno doesn’t always say that much. High Life, his 2014 collaborative album with Karl Hyde, is relatively verbose; Eno is nowadays best known for his pioneering albums of ambient music, beginning in the 1970s. Yet you’d be hard-pressed to find any of […]

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Culture, Prose

Arts Week Daily Music: A.O.S.O.O.N.

‘We want people to hear the stuff and make up their own stories because we captured a snapshot of this feeling that is available. Lyrics have to allow the music to talk on its own in-between and the music has to let the lyrics stir you, burn, lift you.’ – A.O.S.O.O.N. by Jennifer Potter The […]

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Culture, Prose

Arts Week Daily Music: Electric Warrior

by Joe Wilson I was first introduced to the music of T. Rex, when I watched the childhood classic film Billy Elliot, which opens with Billy placing Electric Warrior on a turntable and skipping the needle to ‘Cosmic Dancer’. However, Electric Warrior was released almost thirty years before the film was, at the end of […]

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Culture, Prose

Arts Week Daily Music: Joyful Noise

by Fifi Korda Ever wanted to be lost in some bar down in Columbia with only a funk band, cocktails and some crazy dancing to entertain you? If so, this is the album for you. At the age of just 23, Derek Trucks released his third studio album Joyful Noise on 2 September 2002. Having […]

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