Culture, Prose, Reviews

Spring Awakening: A Review

by Raghav Arora and Samanwita Sen Spring Awakening is a bold take on teenage sexuality. It follows the experiences of various adolescents,’ sexuality coming to full bloom, with a major focus on Wendla Bergmann as she forays into the unfamiliar territory of lustful passion in her relationship with Melchior Gabor. The play strikes a fine […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

My Mother Runs in Zig-Zags: A Review

by Samanwita Sen When walking away after watching a performance of My Mother Runs in Zig-Zags, perhaps the most lasting impression one is left with is how seamlessly and intricately the play has been put together. It’s no secret that, when watching the play, every note that is struck, every movement that is executed, and every […]

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Prose, Reviews

You Are Frogs: A Review

by Michael Angerer The self-described dark comedy You Are Frogs, put on by Practically Peter Productions, is above all a baffling play: perhaps the most baffling theatrical experience to come out of this term. Having ascended the steps up to the Burton Taylor studio, the unsuspecting playgoer intrudes into the depressingly bright-coloured kitchen of two frogs, […]

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Prose, Reviews

Bandages: A Review

by Monim Wains Bandages is not a play that covers up or protects. It is designed to rip off the mask and question you directly. With an intense and emotional exploration of control, image, abuse and violence, Bandages will leave you genuinely disturbed and uncomfortable, which is exactly what it wants to do. The clearly heartfelt issues […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone: A Review

by Michael Angerer As you step into the small dark space of the Burton Taylor Studio to watch Selma Dimitrijevic’s Gods Are Fallen And All Safety Gone, you enter a strangely surreal place: a place in which all eyes rest on two similar figures who sit facing each other, silently staring each other down. The […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Talaash: A Preview

by Zad El Bacha I was cold and tired, searching for Saint Antony’s music room, when a vibrant singing called to me from across the quad. I stepped into the room, and the energy of the cast and the rich, vivid music overwhelmed me. This is how I was introduced to a preview of Talaash, […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The White Devil: A Preview

by Christopher Hill As I walk into the Jesus College lodge to ask where to go for the play, I notice the porter flag down a student who I would later find out to be part of the backstage crew. I didn’t catch the whole conversation but it went something along the lines of: ‘I’m […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The Lonesome West: A Review

by Michael Angerer A kitchen in the west of Ireland, home to two ill-compatible brothers, haunted by the alcoholic parish priest and supplied with booze by an enterprising schoolgirl: such is the scene that unfolds to the audience in the current production of The Lonesome West at the Burton Taylor Studio. The atmosphere of this […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Travesties: A Review

Review by Amanda Higgin Photos by Luke Wintour A Romanian, an Irishman, a Russian and an Englishman walk into a public library in 1917 Zurich. What ensues is a beautifully crafted work, skilfully derived from complex and challenging source material. The design is fascinating, the performances are superb, but most of all my respect must […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Ishtar: A Review

Poignant, dark, and fun – Ishtar is proof that age does not matter, and that some stories are timeless. Bringing to life of one of the oldest poems in the world from Ancient Mesopotamia, Ishtar tells the story of the eponymous Goddess of Love and War (Leela Jadhav) as she ventures into the underworld to […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Blood Wedding: A Review

by Chloe Whitehead ‘Let the Bride awake!’ Intrigue and betrayal reigns in this adaptation of Federico García Lorca’s 1930s classic, Blood Wedding. The Burton Taylor Studio provides an intimate and compelling venue for the drama, with only two rows of seats before the scandal-riven world of rural Spain encroaches upon the audience. Despite only watching […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Hedda: A Review

Review by Amanda Higgin Photos by Georgia Crowther Oriel’s College’s own Poor Print had the first set of eyes on this much-anticipated Playhouse production in dress rehearsal. Even without making allowances for the adjustments and polishing that will take place before opening night, Hedda was excellent. A carefully curated, visually stunning, compelling masterwork – it […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

A Tale of Two Halves: A Review of Twelfth Night

by Chloe Whitehead Five English students, a medic and some wholesome Shakespeare – a day out made in heaven? We thought so. On a rainy Thursday in January we went to see Twelfth Night at the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon, and on the whole witnessed a brilliant performance. Despite being an English student, I’d […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Beautiful Thing: A Review

by Amanda Higgin It is often said that simple things are beautiful, and this show was certainly a Beautiful Thing. This straightforward but delicately told story brings its audience to three neighbouring flats in a London council estate. Jamie lives with his mother, Sandra, and her boyfriend, Tony. On one side lives Leah, who has […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The Lieutenant of Inishmore: A Preview

by Teofil Camarasu Upon arriving to watch a dress rehearsal of the The Lieutenant of Inishmore, I was told that I would be watching the first run of the show with genuine fake blood (until then they had used water instead). The first row of seats had provisionally been designated a splash-zone, and was covered in […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Twelfth Night – A Preview

by Jacob Warn Welcome to a world of music, of love, and of language. This is a world of drunken revelry and cross-gartered madness, overwriting a history inscribed with the vestiges of war, loss and social change. Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night is just a comedy. Some say. But it is this kind of thinking that results in the generic […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

“Killing Hitler” by Bernard Adams – a review

by Rebecca Leigh For its duration, the intimate chapel at Nuffield College will become your TARDIS, transporting you through time and space to the events on British and German soil that lead to the staging of one of the most daring plot of the German resistance in the Second World War. Sensitive direction and sound production, […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Cinderella (Branagh, 2015) – A Review

by Rebecca Leigh Cinderella (2015, Kenneth Branagh) is just the kind of delicious live-action nostalgia-fest you could wish it to be. “The production value of Cinderella is sky-high” The plot follows closely the line of the 1950’s animation, which is to say the programmatic version of the fairytale that I for one grew up with, […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams (7th Week BT) – A Preview

by Jacob Warn As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams is a story about stories. It is a work that enthrals, entrances, and most thoroughly entertains. Having the opportunity to witness a preview of this upcoming production, uncertain and unknowing as I was, has set me in a state of delighted anticipation. “Lady Sarashina is story and story-teller, and […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Sparagmos – A Review

by Matthew Hull Maenads – or Bacchants, as they are often known – have for years captivated the very artists who have captivated us; their raw, unadulterated frenzy presents a vision of sheer human nature which is at once seductive and horrific. So as I sat in Exeter Chapel on Thursday evening for a double-bill […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The Oxford International Art Fair – A Recommendation

by Jacob Warn You should consider going here. It’s the Oxford International Art Fair. There is, of course, a wealth of exhibitions, museums and showcases across Oxford, so all I’m doing is offering another suggestion. I hope for you too it’s still Sunday afternoon. If not, you’ll be too late to enjoy this event, and […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Ophir Productions presents The Effect – a review

by Jacob Warn It is a play that broaches broad and pertinent questions. It is a dramatic presentation of the debates that take place as we increasingly attempt to reconcile a global mental health epidemic with a tendency to extreme, pharmaceutical medicalisation. It asks persistently, what is love? At other times, is asks, what is […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Dido & Aeneas – a St Peter’s Music Society production

by Matthew Hull William Butler Yeats once described Oxford in such terms: “So beautiful one almost expects the people to sing instead of speaking.” “It is like an opera,” he said, and on Wednesday evening (4th February) his words were realised somewhat with the St Peter’s Music Society production of Dido & Aeneas. St Peter’s […]

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Artwork, Culture, Prose, Reviews

OAM & OPS present ‘The Body Electric’

One knows by now that entering a student art exhibition in Oxford is a move made at one’s own peril, as there is always the risk of leaving with a lingering awe-ache inspired by the talent it hosts. Tuesday night was no deviation from the norm. Collaborating to provide us with a tasteful mix of artistic […]

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Culture, Music, Prose, Reviews

A master class with visiting musician Tim Garland

As Christmas festivities gradually turn the academic battle in favour of the hardworking student, last week jazz musicians and enthusiasts alike welcomed reinforcement in the form of a delightful master class given by the college’s visiting musician, Tim Garland. Audience and performers gathered in anticipation of an evening of musical instruction and production that offered something to […]

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Artwork, Culture, Prose, Reviews

‘Sade: Attacking the Sun’

Our woman in Paris delves into the Musée d’Orsay’s exploration of the dark, sexual underworld of one of the West’s most perverted thinkers – and comes out disappointed, unsatisfied, and bored. ‘Sex Sells’ – that’s what we’re always told, and that’s clearly something that the Musée d’Orsay are eagerly aware of. The provocative promotional video […]

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