Prose

Gandalf, Apparition and Wellies – OWA 2015 Winner

This entry was the winner of the Oriel Writing Awards: Prose Category for the year 2015. *** Gandalf, Apparition and Wellies – by Sophie Barnes I sat in a world. Only two things I knew. It was good, and Gandalf was there. Next thing, we all apparated back to this world. Except it wasn’t apparition. Everyone kept […]

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Artwork, Culture, Music, Prose

Oriel Arts Week 2015 – What’s On!

by Jacob Warn – Arts Rep. “In the undergraduate body alone, there is a phenomenal wealth of talent and an overflowing energetic drive in artistic fields.” The Oriel Arts Week is quite simply a week-long celebration of the arts. It is an opportunity to showcase and celebrate the wide-ranging artistic talents of Oriel students and […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams (7th Week BT) – A Preview

by Jacob Warn As I Crossed a Bridge of Dreams is a story about stories. It is a work that enthrals, entrances, and most thoroughly entertains. Having the opportunity to witness a preview of this upcoming production, uncertain and unknowing as I was, has set me in a state of delighted anticipation. “Lady Sarashina is story and story-teller, and […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Sparagmos – A Review

by Matthew Hull Maenads – or Bacchants, as they are often known – have for years captivated the very artists who have captivated us; their raw, unadulterated frenzy presents a vision of sheer human nature which is at once seductive and horrific. So as I sat in Exeter Chapel on Thursday evening for a double-bill […]

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Comment, Prose

Somerville-Oriel Equalities Festival

by Amy Lineham Yesterday marked the start of Somerville-Oriel Equalities festival, a week promoting freedom from discrimination of any kind through a series of events including talks, workshops and film screenings. There are a vast number of reasons such events should be run, however they could all be said to boil down to the same […]

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Culture, Prose

On Sticks (and narratives of self-transference)

by Jacob Warn It was in the coffee-house that I fell asleep and had a dream – horrible thing – about bowing technique. It put me in the awkward position of teacher, teacher to my own family, and forced upon me the undeserved task of explaining the up and down bow. Try as I might, […]

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Culture, Prose

Meeting Michael Morpurgo

by Rebecca Leigh To meet one’s hero is among the most exciting experiences in life: you feel like you’ve known them for years and that they have had such an impact on you without their even knowing it. But it’s also one of the scariest experiences: what if they’re not everything you thought they’d be? […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

The Oxford International Art Fair – A Recommendation

by Jacob Warn You should consider going here. It’s the Oxford International Art Fair. There is, of course, a wealth of exhibitions, museums and showcases across Oxford, so all I’m doing is offering another suggestion. I hope for you too it’s still Sunday afternoon. If not, you’ll be too late to enjoy this event, and […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Ophir Productions presents The Effect – a review

by Jacob Warn It is a play that broaches broad and pertinent questions. It is a dramatic presentation of the debates that take place as we increasingly attempt to reconcile a global mental health epidemic with a tendency to extreme, pharmaceutical medicalisation. It asks persistently, what is love? At other times, is asks, what is […]

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Culture, Prose, Reviews

Dido & Aeneas – a St Peter’s Music Society production

by Matthew Hull William Butler Yeats once described Oxford in such terms: “So beautiful one almost expects the people to sing instead of speaking.” “It is like an opera,” he said, and on Wednesday evening (4th February) his words were realised somewhat with the St Peter’s Music Society production of Dido & Aeneas. St Peter’s […]

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Comment, Prose

Arts and Science: A False Dichotomy?

by Sophie Barnes In 1959, the British scientist and novelist C. P. Snow, in his book The Two Cultures and the Scientific Divide, famously bemoaned the division between art and science in western intellectual society. He expressed how he felt intellectuals in the arts would express their ‘incredulity at the illiteracy of scientists’ at social events (I […]

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Culture, Prose

Where to Brood in Oxford

by Alec Siantonas “The void stands before us, the void behind, and while the spirit to the flesh still cleaves it behoves us to gaze into the abyss with unfrightened eyes” The void stands before us, the void behind, and while the spirit to the flesh still cleaves it behoves us to gaze into the […]

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Culture, Food & Drink, Prose

Food & Wine: Getting the Perfect Match

by Rebecca Leigh, The Poor Print Oenophile Hilary ’15 Week 3 Wine Recommendations I got some really positive feedback on last week’s recommendations, so I’m back again this week! Again, please remember to enjoy wine responsibly. Sunday Watercress and leek soup – Grilled mackerel with horseradish and gooseberries – Rump of lamp served with hispi […]

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Culture, Prose

From the Perspective of an Alien

by Zixin Jiang Picture this: a class of teenage Chinese students sitting with their desks arranged in a circle, listening semi-attentively as their American teacher reads from an essay by an Etonian from the 1940s about what ‘Englishness’ is. This was my sixth-form English literature class, and the essay we were studying was George Orwell’s […]

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Culture, Music, Prose, Reviews

A master class with visiting musician Tim Garland

As Christmas festivities gradually turn the academic battle in favour of the hardworking student, last week jazz musicians and enthusiasts alike welcomed reinforcement in the form of a delightful master class given by the college’s visiting musician, Tim Garland. Audience and performers gathered in anticipation of an evening of musical instruction and production that offered something to […]

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Culture, Music, Prose

Oxford Jazz: A ‘Comprehensible’ Survey

When our parents were young, and punk-rock had captured the hearts and minds of a generation, there must have existed at least one or two thoughtful individuals who would have mused at some point or other, disillusioned with the heady musical vogues of their own day; “whatever did happen to jazz anyway?” But these days, […]

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